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来源:指导活动    发布时间:2017年12月13日 02:16:54    编辑:admin         

Earlier this week, we did something that’s never been done here at the White House – we had a Twitter Town Hall. I even sent my first live tweet as President. The questions at the town hall were sent in from across the country and covered all kinds of topics – from jobs and the economy to education and energy.Lots of people also submitted different versions of another question. They’d start by saying that our politics has grown so contentious. Then they’d ask, When will both parties in Congress come together on behalf of the people who elected them?That’s a really important question, and it goes to the heart of a debate we’re having right now in this country – and that’s the debate about how to tackle the problem of our deficits and our debt.Now, there are obviously real differences in approach. I believe we need a balanced approach. That means taking on spending in our domestic programs and our defense programs. It means addressing the challenges in programs like Medicare so we can strengthen those programs and protect them for future generations. And it means taking on spending in the tax code – spending on tax breaks and deductions for the wealthiest Americans. But I also know that Republicans and Democrats don’t see eye to eye on a number of issues. And so, we’re going to continue working over the weekend to bridge those gaps.The good news is, we agree on some of the big things. We agree that after a decade of racking up deficits and debt, we finally need to get our fiscal house in order. We agree that to do that, both sides are going to have to step outside their comfort zones and make some political sacrifices. And we agree that we simply cannot afford to default on our national obligations for the first time in our history; that we need to uphold the full faith and credit of the ed States of AmericaWith a recovery that’s still fragile and isn’t producing all the jobs we need, the last thing we can afford is the usual partisan game-playing in Washington. By getting our fiscal house in order, Congress will be in a stronger position to focus on some of the job-creating measures I’ve aly proposed – like putting people to work rebuilding America’s infrastructure, or reforming our patent system so that our innovators and entrepreneurs have a greater incentive to generate new products, or making college more affordable for families. And businesses that may be holding back because of the uncertainty surrounding the possibility of a default by the U.S. government will have greater confidence to invest and create jobs.I know we can do this. We can meet our fiscal challenge. That’s what the American people sent us here to do. They didn’t send us here to kick our problems down the road. That’s exactly what they don’t like about Washington. They sent us here to work together. They sent us here to get things done.Right now, we have an extraordinary – and extraordinarily rare – opportunity to move forward in a way that makes sure our government lives within its means, that puts our economy on a sounder footing for the future, and that still invests in the things we need to prosper in the years to come. And I’m hopeful that we will rise to the moment, and seize this opportunity, on behalf of all Americans, and the future we hold in common. Thanks everyone, and have a great weekend201107/143914。

【导言】新华网伦敦5月11日电(记者 郭瑞 康逸)英国保守党领袖卡梅伦11日晚接任首相职务,他应女王伊丽莎白二世的要求着手组建新一届政府。  卡梅伦在唐宁街10号首相官邸前发表讲话说,他和自由民主党领导人克莱格将抛开政党分歧,为了公众和国家的利益而努力工作。为此,他将与自民党结成联盟,组建一个“强大而稳定的政府”。 We have a parliamentary system, not a presidential system, in this country. As I said on Friday, with no party able to command a parliamentary majority arising from the General Election, my constitutional duty as Prime Minister is to ensure government continues while parties explore options for forming a new administration with majority support in the House of Commons.The business of government has continued, including concerted action in Europe today to avert the financial crisis in the euro area. Alistair Darling, the Chancellor, spent much of his time yesterday at the European finance ministers' meeting in Brussels.This morning, I had conversations with the president of the European Council, the managing director of the International Monetary Fund and the president of the European Central Bank. I have said I would do all I could to ensure that a stable, strong and principled government is formed, able to tackle Britain's economic and political challenges effectively.As we know, the Liberal Democrats felt they should first talk to the Conservative Party. Mr Clegg has just informed me that, while he intends to continue his dialogue that he has begun with the Conservatives, he now wishes also to take forward formal discussions with the Labour Party.I believe it is sensible and it is in the national interest to respond positively.The Cabinet will meet soon. A formal policy negotiating process is being established under the arrangements made by the Cabinet Secretary, similar to the negotiations between other parties.The first priority should be an agreed deficit reduction plan to support economic growth and a return to full employment.I know that both parties recognise the importance of ensuring economic stability in the markets and protecting Britain's standing and both are agreed on the need for a strong and full deficit reduction plan over the coming years.There is also a progressive majority in Britain and I believe it could be in the interests of the whole country to form a progressive coalition government.In addition to the economic priorities, in my view, only such a progressive government could meet the demand for political and electoral change which the British people made last Thursday.Our commitments on a new voting system for the House of Commons and for the election of the House of Lords are clearly part of this.I would however like to say something also about my own position.If it becomes clear that the national interest, which is stable and principled government, can be best served by forming a coalition between the Labour Party and the Liberal Democrats, then I believe I should discharge that duty to form that government which would, in my view, command a majority in the House of Commons in the Queen's Speech and any other confidence votes.But I have no desire to stay in my position longer than is needed to ensure the path to economic growth is assured and the process of political reform we have agreed moves forward quickly.The reason that we have a hung Parliament is that no single party and no single leader was able to win the full support of the country.As leader of my party, I must accept that that is a judgment on me. I therefore intend to ask the Labour Party to set in train the processes needed for its own leadership election.I would hope that it would be completed in time for the new leader to be in post by the time of the Labour Party conference.I will play no part in that contest. I will back no individual candidate.I believe that the British people now want us to focus on the economy, the continuing fight against terrorism, the terrorist threat to our country.They want us to continue to pursue the economic recovery, and I will do so with my usual vigour and determination, and I will do all in my power to support the British troops whose service and sacrifice create a debt of gratitude we can never fully repay.And I believe on Thursday the country was also telling us that they want a new politics, and that the political reforms we seek will help deliver that change. I now intend to facilitate the discussions that the Liberal Democratic party has asked for. Thank you very much. As you will understand I will take no questions this evening. Other discussions can be had later.Thank you very much.201005/103548。

THE PRESIDENT: Thank you for the warm welcome. And Laura and I are thrilled to be here at Kearny School. We have come because this is one of the really fine schools in the city of Philadelphia. We bring greetings from the Nation's Capital, but more importantly, we bring appreciation for those who are working so hard to make sure that every child can learn. You know, seven years ago today, I had the honor of signing a bill that forever changed America's school systems. It was called the No Child Left Behind Act. I firmly believe that thanks to this law, more students are learning, an achievement gap is closing. And on this anniversary, I have come to talk about why we need to keep the law strong. If you find a piece of legislation that is working, it is important to make sure the underpinnings of that law remain strong. I do want to thank Laura for joining me. She has been an awesome wife and a great First Lady. (Applause.) Our journey together in Washington has been fantastic, and I thank her very much for her love. I am proud to be here with Arlene Ackerman. Thank you for your introduction, Arlene, and thank you for being -- (applause.) Arlene is a reform-minded leader. And by that, I mean you have a Superintendent here who is willing to challenge the status quo if the status quo is unacceptable. Sometimes that's hard in public life. You see the status quo, and people are saying, oh, let's just leave it the way it is; it's too hard to change. And you have a Superintendent here that says, if we're finding failure we're going to change. And I want to thank you for taking on this important assignment. I'm proud to be here with my buddy. I guess it's okay to call the Secretary of Education here "buddy." That means friend. And she has been our friend for a long time. She is a great Secretary of Education. And, Margaret, I want to thank you for being here. (Applause.) I want to thank the senior Senator -- I guess it's okay to call you "senior" -- Arlen Specter. He is a good friend, and he cares a lot about the state of Pennsylvania and the education systems in the state. So thank you for coming, my friend. (Applause.) Jerry Zahorchak is with us, the Pennsylvania Department of Education Secretary. Jerry, thank you for being here, and thank you for serving. I want to thank all the state and local officials, particularly the state representative from this district has kindly come by to say hello and participate in a roundtable we just had. Roy Romer, former governor of Colorado, and an education reformer, has just spoken. I want to thank Roy. He happens to be the chairman of Strong American Schools. It's got a nice ring to it, doesn't it? Strong American Schools. That means schools that actually teach people how to , write, and add and subtract. At least that's my definition of strong American schools. I want to thank very much the Reverend Al Sharpton. Now, some of you are probably about to fall out of your chair -- (laughter) -- when you know that Al and I have found common ground. And by the way, it's on an important issue. See, he cares just as much as I care about making sure every child learns to , write, and add and subtract. And I want to thank you for your leadership on this issue, and I appreciate you -- (applause.) I want to thank the teachers who work here. I particularly want to thank Principal Spagnola for her leadership. (Applause.) And the thing about educators -- first of all, every good school has got a principal who is a good principal. That's generally the key ingredient to success, somebody who can set high standards and motivate. And this principal can do just that. And for the teachers, thank you for taking on a noble profession. Laura and I are proud to report that one of our daughters is a teacher, and it makes us feel just incredibly great to know that we've raised a child who is willing to take on an important task of teaching a child to be able to have the skills necessary to succeed in life. There are a lot of reformers here, and I welcome the reformers. These are people from society who say, I want to help the school system succeed. When I got off Air Force One today, I met Adam Bruckner. I mentioned to some kids, have you ever heard of Adam Bruckner? And they said, "You're talking about Mr. Adam." I said, that's who I'm talking about. He is volunteer. He's a mentor. He happens to be a professional soccer coach, which means he knows how to play soccer, and he is willing to lend his skills, and more importantly, his heart, to teach a child the beauty of being a sports person, and the lessons of life that come from good competition. And so I want to thank you very much, Adam, for being here, and representing all the folks who volunteer at this program. (Applause.) At the end of the presidency, you get to do a lot of "lasts." I don't know if you saw on TV, but I pardoned my last Thanksgiving turkey. (Laughter.) This is my last policy speech. As President of the ed States, this is the last policy address I will give. What makes it interesting is that it's the same subject of my first policy address as President of the ed States, which is education and education reform. I hope you can tell that education is dear to my heart. I care a lot about whether or not our children can learn to , write, and add and subtract. When I was a governor of Texas, I didn't like it one bit when I'd go to schools in my state and realize that children were not learning so they could realize their God-given potential. I didn't like it because I knew the future of our society depended upon a good, sound education. I was sharing this story with people that Laura and I just met with, and at the time I went to a high school in my state, one of our big city high schools. And I said, thanks for teaching -- I met this teacher. I think his name is Brown, if I'm not mistaken. SECRETARY SPELLINGS: Nelson Brown. THE PRESIDENT: Nelson Brown. And he taught geography and history, if I'm not mistaken. I said, "How is it going, Mr. Brown?" He said, "It's going lousy." I said, "Why?" He said, "Because my kids cannot and they're in high school." You see, the system was just satisfied with just shuffling kids through -- if you're 14 you're supposed to be here, if you're 16 you're supposed to be there. Rarely was the question asked: Can you ? Or can you write? Or can you add and can you subtract? And so we decided to do something about it. We said such a system is unacceptable to the future of our state. And that's the spirit we brought to Washington, D.C. It's unacceptable to our country that vulnerable children slip through the cracks. And by the way, guess who generally those children are? They happen to be inner-city kids, or children whose parents don't speak English as a first language. They're the easiest children to forget about. We saw a culture of low expectations. You know what happens when you have low expectations? You get lousy results. And when you get lousy results, you have people who say, there's no future for me in this country. And so we decided to do something about it. We accepted the responsibility of the office to which I had been elected. It starts with this concept: Every child can learn. We believe that it is important to have a high quality education if one is going to succeed in the 21st century. It's no longer acceptable to be cranking people out of the school system and saying, okay, just go -- you know, you can make a living just through manual labor alone. That's going to happen for some, but it's not the future of America, if we want to be a competitive nation as we head into the 21st century. We believe that every child has dignity and worth. But it wasn't just me who believed that. Fortunately, when we got to Washington, a lot of other people believed it -- Democrats and Republicans. I know there's a lot of talk about how Washington is divided, and it has been at times -- at times. And it can get awfully ugly in Washington. But, nevertheless, if you look at the history over the past eight years, there have been moments where we have come together. And the No Child Left Behind Act is one such moment. 01/60744。

Hi, everybody. Earlier this week, I spent some time with the hardworking men and women of the American auto industry, who are busy writing a new chapter in Americarsquo;s story.Just a few years ago, their industry was shedding hundreds of thousands of jobs. Two of the Big Three ndash; GM and Chrysler ndash; were on the brink of failure. If we had let this great American industry collapse ndash; if we had let Detroit go bankrupt ndash; more than one million Americans would have lost their jobs in the middle of the worst recession since the Great Depression.I refused to let that happen. These jobs are worth more than just a paycheck ndash; theyrsquo;re a source of pride and a ticket to the middle class. These companies are worth more than just the cars they build ndash; theyrsquo;re a symbol of American innovation and a source of our manufacturing might.So in exchange for help, we demanded responsibility. We got the companies to retool and restructure. Everyone sacrificed. And three years later, the American auto industry is back.Today, GM is the number one automaker in the world. Chrysler is growing faster in America than any other car company. Ford is investing billions in American plants and factories, and plans to bring thousands of jobs back home. All told, the entire industry has added more than 200,000 new jobs over the past two and a half years.And theyrsquo;re not just building cars again ndash; theyrsquo;re building better cars. Thanks to new fuel efficiency standards we put in place, theyrsquo;re building cars that will average nearly 55 miles per gallon by the middle of the next decade. Thatrsquo;s almost double what they get today. That means folks will be able to fill up every two weeks instead of every week, saving the typical family more than ,000 at the pump over time. Thatrsquo;s a big deal, especially as families are yet again feeling the pinch from rising gas prices.So whatrsquo;s happening in Detroit will make a difference. But it wonrsquo;t solve everything. Therersquo;s no silver bullet for avoiding spikes in gas prices every year. Therersquo;s no shortcut to taking control of our energy future. We have to pursue an all-of-the-above strategy that helps develop every source of American energy. And we have to do it now.The good news is, wersquo;ve been making progress. Take a look at this chart. Six years ago, 60% of the oil we used was imported. Since I took office, Americarsquo;s dependence on foreign oil has decreased every single year. In fact, in 2010, for the first time in thirteen years, less than half the petroleum we consumed was imported. Part of that is because wersquo;re producing more oil here at home than at any time in the last eight years.But we canrsquo;t just drill our way out of this problem. While we consume 20 percent of the worldrsquo;s oil, we only have 2 percent of the worldrsquo;s oil reserves. Wersquo;ve got to develop new technology that will help us use new forms of energy. Thatrsquo;s been a priority of mine as President. And because of the investments wersquo;ve made, our use of clean, renewable energy has nearly doubled ndash; and thousands of Americans have jobs because of it.Now we need to keep at it. And to do that, we need to make the right choices.Herersquo;s one we can make right now. Every year, billion of your tax dollars go to subsidizing the oil industry. These are the same companies making record profits ndash; tens of billions of dollars a year. I donrsquo;t think oil companies need more corporate welfare. Congress should end this taxpayer giveaway. If you agree with me, Irsquo;m asking you to e-mail, call, or Tweet your representative. Tell them to stop fighting for oil companies. Tell them to start fighting for working families. Tell them to fight for the clean energy future thatrsquo;s within our reach. Because the sooner we all get started, the sooner wersquo;ll get there together. Thanks and have a great weekend.201203/173505。

One final proposal, one close to my heart: Sport represents a source of enjoyment and ennoblement, and you may have noted that the Republic of Korea —South Korea—has offered to permit certain events of the 1988 Olympics to take place in the North. International sports competitions of all kinds could take place in both parts of this city. And what better way to demonstrate to the world the openness of this city than to offer in some future year to hold the Olympic games here in Berlin, East and West. In these four decades, as I have said, you Berliners have built a great city. You've done so in spite of threats -- the Soviet attempts to impose the East-mark, the blockade. Today the city thrives in spite of the challenges implicit in the very presence of this wall. What keeps you here? Certainly there's a great deal to be said for your fortitude, for your defiant courage. But I believe there's something deeper, something that involves Berlin's whole look and feel and way of life -- not mere sentiment. No one could live long in Berlin without being completely disabused of illusions. Something, instead, that has seen the difficulties of life in Berlin but chose to accept them, that continues to build this good and proud city in contrast to a surrounding totalitarian presence, that refuses to release human energies or aspirations, something that speaks with a powerful voice of affirmation, that says "yes" to this city, yes to the future, yes to freedom. In a word, I would submit that what keeps you in Berlin—is "love." Love both profound and abiding. Perhaps this gets to the root of the matter, to the most fundamental distinction of all between East and West. The totalitarian world produces backwardness because it does such violence to the spirit, thwarting the human impulse to create, to enjoy, to worship. The totalitarian world finds even symbols of love and of worship an affront. 201111/160671。

演讲文本US President's radio address on social security (January 15,2005) THE PRESIDENT: Good morning. This week, I met with some of our fellow citizens from across the country to discuss one of the great responsibilities of our nation: strengthening Social Security for our children and grandchildren. For 70 years, the Social Security system has fulfilled the promise made by President Franklin Roosevelt, keeping our elderly citizens out of poverty, while assuring younger Americans a more secure future. Along with employer-funded pensions and personal savings, Social Security is for millions of Americans a critical element to their plans for a stable retirement. And for today's senior citizens and those nearing retirement, the system is sound. But for younger workers, Social Security is on the road to bankruptcy. And if we do not fix it now, the system will not be able to pay the benefits promised to our children and grandchildren. When President Roosevelt signed the Social Security Act in 1935, the average life expectancy was about 60 years, which meant that most Americans would not live to become eligible for benefits, then set at age 65. Today, most Americans enjoy longer lives and longer retirements. And that presents a looming challenge. Because Social Security was created as a pay-as-you-go system, current retirees are supported by the taxes paid by current workers. Unfortunately, the ratio of workers to retirees is falling steadily. In the 1950s, there were about 16 workers paying in for each person drawing out. Today, it's about three workers for every beneficiary. And by the time today's workers in their mid 20s begin to retire, there will be just over two. What this means is that in the year 2018, the system will go into the red -- paying out more in benefits each year than it receives in payroll taxes. After that, the shortfalls will grow larger until 2042, when the whole system will be bankrupt. The total projected shortfall is .4 trillion. To put that number in perspective, .4 trillion is nearly twice the combined wages of every single working American in 2004. Every year we put off the coming crisis, the higher the price our children and grandchildren will have to pay. According to the Social Security trustees, waiting just one year adds 0 billion to the cost of fixing Social Security. If we do not act now, government will eventually be left with two choices: dramatically reduce benefits, or impose a massive economically ruinous tax increase. Leaving our children with such a mess would be a generational betrayal. We owe it to the American worker to fix Social Security now. And our reforms begin with three essential commitments. First, if you're receiving your Social Security check, or nearing retirement, nothing will change for you. Your benefits are secure. Second, we must not increase payroll taxes on American workers because raising taxes will slow economic growth. Third, we must give younger workers -- on a voluntary basis -- the option to save some of their payroll taxes in a personal retirement account. Unlike Social Security benefits, which can be taken away by politicians, the money in a personal account would be yours. And unlike the money you put into Social Security today, the money in personal accounts would grow. A child born today can expect less than a 2 percent return after inflation on the money they pay into Social Security. A conservative mix of bonds and stocks would over time produce a larger return. Personal accounts would give every younger worker, regardless of income, the chance to save a nest egg for their later years and pass something on to their children. Saving Social Security is an economic challenge. But it is also a profound moral obligation. Today's young Americans deserve the same security their parents and grandparents enjoyed. Because the system is broken and promises are being made that Social Security cannot keep, we need to act now to strengthen and preserve Social Security. I look forward to working with members of Congress from both parties to keep the promise of Social Security. Thank you for listening. 200603/5028。

Learn how billion in Recovery Act funding will not only allow 12,000 medical research projects to continue, but create tens of thousands of jobs associated with them. September 30, .(public domain) Creating Jobs amp; Finding Cures: The Recovery Act at Work from White House on Vimeo.10/85879。

President Bush Meets with Pakistani Prime Minister Gilani   PRESIDENT BUSH: Mr. Prime Minister, thank you for coming. It's the first time we've had a chance to visit, and I appreciate the very candid discussion we had. I appreciate the fact that you're committed to working to make sure that relations between the ed States and Pakistan are strong and vibrant and productive.   And one area where our relations can be productive is we cooperate on economic matters, because the truth of the matter is, in a population that has got hope as a result of being able to find work, is a population that is going to make it harder for extremists and terrorists to find safe haven.   And so I appreciate very much our candid discussion about the economy. I fully understand that you're dealing with serious food prices. I appreciate the compassion you showed for the people of Pakistan. I told the President -- the Prime Minister that one thing we can do, having talked to the President of Afghanistan, is help Afghanistan grow wheat, help Afghanistan become self-sufficient, which will take the pressure off of the people of Pakistan.   The Prime Minister and I talked, of course, about our common desire to protect ourselves and others from those who would do harm. And I want to thank your steadfast support and your strength of character and your understanding of the problems we face. Relations are good between our two countries and they will continue to be good. And I want to thank you for coming and to -- and advancing those relations. Welcome.   PRIME MINISTER GILANI: Thank you. Thank you very much, Mr. President, for this opportunity. I want to take your call to confidence that, with the change of the new government in Pakistan, with a new democratic government in this country, there's a change for the system. And I've been unanimously elected as the Prime Minister of Pakistan; that's the first time in the history of Pakistan. And we have discussed in detail on a few issues like economics, like the food problems, like the energy problems.   And the common problem, and that is the biggest threat to the world, is terrorism and extremism. And our government is committed to fight for terrorism and extremism; it is against the humanity, it's against the world, and I have lost my own great leader, Benazir Bhutto, because of terrorism.   Therefore I pledge and I stand by the world to fight against extremism and terrorism. I appreciate the support of Mr. President for our concerns on both social sectors, economic sectors, energy sectors, and we want to work together on all these issues. And I once again thank Mr. President for extending this opportunity.   PRESIDENT BUSH: Yes, sir, Mr. Prime Minister. Thank you, Mr. Prime Minister. 200806/41597。